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Inventing Process

A better way to make dreams come true

Research

Inventionland researchers, designers and builders work together to find the new and unique features of an idea that separate it from other products already on store shelves.

Design

Once product research has been completed on a new idea that is submitted to Inventionland, the design team gets to work on finding possible solutions for the problem that a client’s idea is trying to solve.

Prototyping

New invention ideas become workable product samples as a result of Inventionland’s prototyping process. Following the design and engineering processes, which lay out product ideas digitally, the prototyping process creates a tangible sample that can be interacted with and tested.

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Packaging

Similar to the way that products are designed and engineered at Inventionland, product packaging is first designed, then engineered upon client approval. Using the product dimensions that are calculated in the engineering phase of the product development process, packaging and graphics artists work side by side to design attractive, cost-effective product packaging.

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Licensing

At Inventionland, when new product ideas reach the licensing stage, their chances for store success soar. Inventionland’s licensing professionals will tell you that they “try longer” to place new invention ideas on store shelves and since products created at Inventionland have now sold in over 1,200 stores, that motto is hard to dispute.

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Manufacturing

Though manufacturing is not an official step in the inventing process, Inventionland’s intimate relationship with corporations and manufacturers is undeniably impactful in bringing new product ideas to store shelves. For corporations and manufacturers, being able to work on new product ideas with the professionals at Inventionland is a partnership made in innovation heaven.

Patenting

To patent or not to patent? That is often a question that is posed to the professionals at Inventionland. Certainly, there is a time to patent; but, at various steps in the inventing process, the Inventionland crew throws a caution flag up at the mere mention of the word “patent.”